Wednesday, 8 October 2014

Lunar Eclipse October 2014

Got up early to see the total lunar eclipse expecting clouds and rain. Instead I was rewarded with a nice clear sky, freshly "washed" by hard rain. It was chilly and humid, but the Moon hung brightly in the sky.

My new binoculars, 15x70, saw their first umbra - just the Earth's on the Moon and not from the Moon. Still the view was fantastic. These big eyes will work well for a TSE! Hefty and waterproof (so they say, not going to test it) they are a bit much to hold steady for long. But for quick views they work fine and I do have a tripod adapter.

The Moon moved to an area that I could no longer see it from our front area (trees) and I had to go out in the parking lot (well lit) to see it. The view was great. To the left one could pick out Uranus with the binoculars and I was please to see it appeared in the image linked in hi-res below.

Image of total lunar eclipse 1.8s exposure with Sony 5N on tripod.

Thursday, 2 October 2014

Tecumseh and the Eclipse of 1806

I updated the webpage with the story about Tecumseh and the 1806 total solar eclipse. Maps showing that location of the village used by Tecumseh and his brother were not in the central path are now included. The location of the village would have shown a 99% total and while impressive, it does not have the impact of a total solar eclipse.

Eclipses viewed along the edge of the central path are prolonged diamond rings. A 99% eclipse can be full of beads as the Sun shines through valleys and is blocked by mountains. One might also catch a glimpse of the corona on the opposite side of the beads/sliver of sunlight however it is difficult and potentially dangerous.

In 2017 a total solar eclipse will cross the USA. Should your home location be in the 90% or greater range plan to move to the central path for the full eclipse effect. Remember, you will see a 90% and greater partial in the path of totality!